Changes in attitudes, beliefs, and experiences related to pregnancy during graduate medical education training from 2005 to 2021

Authors

  • Lindsay Warner Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, USA
  • Lindsay Hunter Guevara Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, USA
  • Andrea Watson Department of Oncology, Essentia Health, Duluth, USA
  • Sara Farmer Department of Clinical Trials and Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, USA
  • Ramila Mehta Department of Clinical Trials and Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, USA
  • Jason Homme Department of Community Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, USA

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.17305/bb.2023.9865

Keywords:

Maternity leave, parental leave, pregnancy, residency, training

Abstract

Today, 50% of medical students are women, and residency and fellowship training years overlap with peak times for starting families. The authors describe attitudes toward pregnancy during residency and fellowship and report pregnancy rates and complications for female residents and resident partners across several decades. A web-based survey was emailed to 1,057 residents in 2005 (period 1) and 1,860 residents in 2021 (period 2). Anonymous surveys were sent to all trainees including pregnant trainees, affected co-trainees and trainee partners. Resident attitudes and pregnancy characteristics were compared between groups using the chi-square (χ2) test for categorical variables and the Kruskal-Wallis test for ordinal variables. A total of 442 residents (41.8%) responded to the 2005 survey, and 525 (28.2%) responded to the 2021 survey. Most residents who covered for a pregnant resident had positive feelings about covering for their colleagues during both time periods, although more positive attitudes were present during the period 2. Only about 10% of residents received compensation for their coverage during both time periods. Among residents with a pregnancy during training (i.e., themselves or partners), most characterized having a baby in training as “somewhat difficult” or “very difficult” at both time periods. Pregnancy complication rates were 33% and 44% for training years 2005 and 2021. As medical education evolves, training programs should be proactive in creating structured support systems for pregnant residents and resident partners to minimize adverse maternal and fetal outcomes and to improve training programs. Future studies are needed to elucidate the causality of higher-than-expected pregnancy complication rates.

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Author Biographies

  • Lindsay Warner, Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, USA

    Dr Warner is a consultant in the Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, and an assistant professor of anesthesiology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science, Rochester, Minnesota.

  • Lindsay Hunter Guevara, Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, USA

    Dr Hunter Guevara is a consultant in the Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, and an assistant professor of anesthesiology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science, Rochester, Minnesota.

  • Andrea Watson, Department of Oncology, Essentia Health, Duluth, USA

    Dr Watson is a staff physician, Pediatric Hematology and Pediatric Oncology, Essentia Health–St. Mary’s Children’s Hospital, Duluth, Minnesota.

  • Sara Farmer, Department of Clinical Trials and Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, USA

    Sara A. Farmer is a statistical programmer, Division of Clinical Trials and Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.

  • Ramila Mehta, Department of Clinical Trials and Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, USA

    Ramila Mehta is a statistical programmer, Division of Clinical Trials and Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.

  • Jason Homme, Department of Community Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, USA

    Dr Homme is a consultant, Division of Community Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, and an assistant professor of pediatrics, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science, Rochester, Minnesota.

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Published

02-05-2024

Issue

Section

Translational and Clinical Research

Categories

How to Cite

1.
Changes in attitudes, beliefs, and experiences related to pregnancy during graduate medical education training from 2005 to 2021. Biomol Biomed [Internet]. 2024 May 2 [cited 2024 May 20];24(3):606–611. Available from: https://bjbms.org/ojs/index.php/bjbms/article/view/9865