Increased carotid intima-media thickness and cardiometabolic risk factors are associated with IL-6 gene polymorphisms in Mexican individuals: The Genetics of Atherosclerotic Disease Mexican study

Authors

  • Rosalinda Posadas-Sánchez Department of Endocrinology, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez, Mexico City, Mexico
  • Ángel Rene López-Uribe Department of Endocrinology, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez, Mexico City, Mexico
  • Juan Reyes-Barrera Department of Endocrinology, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez, Mexico City, Mexico
  • Julian Ramírez-Bello Department of Endocrinology, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez, Mexico City, Mexico
  • María del Rocio Martínez-Alvarado Department of Endocrinology, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez, Mexico City, Mexico
  • Gilberto Vargas-Alarcón Department or Molecular Biology and Research Direction, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez, Mexico City, Mexico

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.17305/bb.2023.9495

Keywords:

Carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), cardiometabolic risk factors, interleukin 6 (IL-6), polymorphisms, coronary artery disease (CAD)

Abstract

Interleukin 6 (IL-6) is a cytokine implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. This study aimed to determine the association of three IL-6 gene polymorphisms with increased carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and cardiometabolic risk factors. Three IL-6 polymorphisms (rs1800795, rs2069827, and rs1800796) were analyzed in 178 individuals with increased CIMT (CIMT ≥ 75th percentile) and 906 individuals without increased CIMT (CIMT < 75th percentile). Logistic regression, adjusted for confounding variables, was employed to assess the associations. The rs1800796 polymorphism was significantly associated with an elevated risk of increased CIMT (OR = 1.354, Padditive = 0.016; OR = 1.803, Precessive = 0.014; OR = 1.989, Pcodominant2 = 0.008). One haplotype (GCG) correlated with a higher risk of increased CIMT (OR = 1.288; P = 0.008), while another (GGG) demonstrated a reduced risk (OR = 0.773; P = 0.006). In individuals without increased CIMT, the rs2069827 polymorphism was associated with low risks of central obesity, hypoalphalipoproteinemia, and a low risk of presenting with high levels of total cholesterol (TC), non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) /HDL-C index, apolipoprotein B, and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase. The rs1800796 polymorphism was associated with a low risk of adipose tissue insulin resistance, and the rs1800795 was associated with a minimal risk of central obesity and hypoalphalipoproteinemia. Among those with increased CIMT, the rs2069827 was associated with low risks of central obesity, hypertriglyceridemia, metabolic syndrome, and a high triglyceride (TG)/HDL-C index, while rs1800796 was associated with a low risk of fatty liver. Similar IL-6 concentrations were observed in both individuals with and without increased CIMT. In conclusion, the rs1800796 polymorphism is associated with increased CIMT, while the rs2069827 and rs1800795 are linked to cardiovascular risk factors.

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Author Biographies

  • Juan Reyes-Barrera, Department of Endocrinology, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez, Mexico City, Mexico

    Department of Endocrinology

  • Julian Ramírez-Bello, Department of Endocrinology, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez, Mexico City, Mexico

    Department of Endocrinology

Increased carotid intima-media thickness and cardiometabolic risk factors are associated with IL-6 gene polymorphisms in Mexican individuals: The GEA Mexican study

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Published

11-03-2024

Issue

Section

Molecular Biology

Categories

How to Cite

1.
Increased carotid intima-media thickness and cardiometabolic risk factors are associated with IL-6 gene polymorphisms in Mexican individuals: The Genetics of Atherosclerotic Disease Mexican study. Biomol Biomed [Internet]. 2024 Mar. 11 [cited 2024 Apr. 18];24(2):315–322. Available from: https://bjbms.org/ojs/index.php/bjbms/article/view/9495