HLA genotyping in pediatric celiac disease patients

  • Biljana Stanković Institute of Molecular Genetics and Genetic Engineering, University of Belgrade
  • Nedeljko Radlović University Children’s Hospital, Medical Faculty, University of Belgrade
  • Zoran Leković University Children’s Hospital, Medical Faculty, University of Belgrade
  • Dragana Ristić University Children’s Hospital, Medical Faculty, University of Belgrade
  • Vladimir Radlović University Children’s Hospital, Medical Faculty, University of Belgrade
  • Gordana Nikčević Institute of Molecular Genetics and Genetic Engineering, University of Belgrade
  • Nikola Kotur Institute of Molecular Genetics and Genetic Engineering, University of Belgrade
  • Ksenija Vučićević Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Kragujevac
  • Tatjana Kostić Institute of Molecular Genetics and Genetic Engineering, University of Belgrade
  • Sonja Pavlović Institute of Molecular Genetics and Genetic Engineering, University of Belgrade
  • Branka Zukic Institute of Molecular Genetics and Genetic Engineering, University of Belgrade
Keywords: celiac disease, HLA-DQ alleles, HLA genotyping

Abstract

Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disease in the small intestine triggered by gluten uptake that occurs in genetically susceptible individuals. HLA-DQ2 protein encoded by HLA-DQA1*05 and DQB1*02 alleles is found in 90-95% of CD patients. All of the remaining patients carry HLA-DQ8 protein encoded by HLA-DQA1*03 and DQB1*03:02 alleles. Specific HLA-DQ genotypes define different risk for CD incidence. Presence of susceptible HLA-DQ genotypes does not predict certain disease development, but their absence makes CD very unlikely, close to 100%. Here we presented for the first time the distribution of HLA-DQ genotypes in the group of pediatric celiac patients from the University Children’s Hospital, Belgrade, Serbia and estimated risk for CD development that these genotypes confer. Seventy three celiac disease patients and 62 healthy individuals underwent genotyping for DQA1, DQB alleles and DRB1 allele. 94.5% of patients carried alleles that encode DQ2 protein variant and 2.7% carried alleles that encode DQ8 protein variant. Two patients carried single DQB1*02 allele. No patients were negative for all the alleles predisposing to CD. The highest HLA-DQ genotype risk for CD development was found in group of patients homozygous for DQ2.5 haplotype, followed by the group of heterozygous carriers of DQ2.5 haplotype in combination with DQB1*02 allele within the other haplotype. The lowest risk was observed in carriers of a single copy of DQB1*02 or DQA1*05 allele or other non-predisposing alleles. HLA genotyping, more informative than serological testing commonly used, proved to be a useful diagnostic tool for excluding CD development.

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Author Biographies

Biljana Stanković, Institute of Molecular Genetics and Genetic Engineering, University of Belgrade
Laboratory for Molecular Biomedicine
Nedeljko Radlović, University Children’s Hospital, Medical Faculty, University of Belgrade
Department of Gastroenterology and Nutrition
Zoran Leković, University Children’s Hospital, Medical Faculty, University of Belgrade
Department of Gastroenterology and Nutrition
Dragana Ristić, University Children’s Hospital, Medical Faculty, University of Belgrade
Department of Gastroenterology and Nutrition
Vladimir Radlović, University Children’s Hospital, Medical Faculty, University of Belgrade
Department of Gastroenterology and Nutrition
Gordana Nikčević, Institute of Molecular Genetics and Genetic Engineering, University of Belgrade
Laboratory for Molecular Biomedicine
Nikola Kotur, Institute of Molecular Genetics and Genetic Engineering, University of Belgrade
Laboratory for Molecular Biomedicine
Tatjana Kostić, Institute of Molecular Genetics and Genetic Engineering, University of Belgrade
Laboratory for Molecular Biomedicine
Sonja Pavlović, Institute of Molecular Genetics and Genetic Engineering, University of Belgrade
Laboratory for Molecular Biomedicine
Branka Zukic, Institute of Molecular Genetics and Genetic Engineering, University of Belgrade
Laboratory for Molecular Biomedicine

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Published
2014-08-16
How to Cite
1.
Stanković B, Radlović N, Leković Z, Ristić D, Radlović V, Nikčević G, Kotur N, Vučićević K, Kostić T, Pavlović S, Zukic B. HLA genotyping in pediatric celiac disease patients. Bosn J of Basic Med Sci [Internet]. 2014Aug.16 [cited 2019Dec.9];14(3):171-6. Available from: http://bjbms.org/ojs/index.php/bjbms/article/view/171
Section
Translational and Clinical Research